Every so often, we chat with an alum about what they do and how they got there. Robert Deloatch ’11, M19, computer science, has followed his research interests to an exciting job at Apple. We asked Robert about what his experience as a Meyerhoff Scholar means in his life today, and what he would say to a future scholar.

Q: What is your current job title and employer?

A: I am a Human Factors Engineer at Apple Inc.

Q: Tell us about your current job and what you enjoy most about it.

A: I manage a team of researchers who focus on applying user-centered design principles to design and develop Apple products. I collaborate with teams at Apple to come up with new ways to continue to enhance the customer experience. I enjoy the fast paced environment of Apple which allows for conducting research that leads to immediate customer impact.

Q: When you think about the “ripple effect” of the Meyerhoff Scholars Program, how do you see that playing out in your field and in your life?

A: I’ve been amazed at how the Meyerhoff Scholars Program has continued to affect my field and life. I’ve encountered researchers and faculty of color that were part of the Meyerhoff Scholars Program or programs that were modeled after Meyerhoff at conferences and internships. It’s been a reminder to me of the staying power of such a program and how it’s focus on leadership, diversity, and scholarship has been ingrained into my beliefs and relationships.

Q: Why is the Meyerhoff mission so important, not only to you, but to society?

A: The Meyerhoff mission is important because diversity in STEM is important. To generate the best ideas and solve complex problems requires discussion and being challenged. Having groups from various backgrounds and perspectives is foundational to promote useful discussion.

Q: What advice would you give to a student considering the program?

A: I would tell a student to follow the advice of your Meyerhoff staff. They have been instrumental in helping produce thousands of amazing scholars and have your best interest at heart. Listen to them.

Learn more about the Meyerhoff Scholars Program here.

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